ATrain Education

 

Continuing Education for Health Professionals

Bloodborne Pathogens: HBV, HCV, and HIV

Module 10

Resources and References

Resources

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard
800 321-OSHA (6742)
http://osha.bloodbornepathogens.us/

Fact Sheets on OSHA Standard available
in single copies from regional offices or:
OSHA Publications
Room N-3101
200 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20210

To report unsafe working conditions or
safety/health violations to OSHA, contact
nearest OSHA office or phone
800-321-OSHA (6742)
TTY 877 889 5627
https://www.osha.gov/html/Feed_Back.html

OSHA’s mailing address is:
U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety & Health Administration
200 Constitution Avenue
Washington, D.C. 20210

References

National

American Nurses Association (ANA). (2008, June 24). Workplace Safety and Needlestick Injuries Are Top Concerns for Nurses. Press release. Retrieved from www.nursingworld.org.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2013a). Hepatitis. Retrieved August 21, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/hepb.pdf/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2013b). Bloodborne Infectious Diseases: HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C. Retrieved July 23, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/bbp/surveillance.html.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2013c; latest update 2007). Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings, 2007. Retrieved January 6, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/gl_isolation _standard.html.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2011, September). Viral Hepatitis Surveillance, United States, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/statisticshbv.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2010). Viral Hepatitis Surveillance, United States, 2010. Retrieved August 21, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics/2010surveillance/Commentary.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2008). Recommendations for identification and public health management of persons with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. MMWR 2008;57(No. RR-08).

Gershon RR, Pearson JM, Sherman MF, et al. (2009). The prevalence and risk factors for percutaneous injuries in registered nurses in the home healthcare sector. American Journal of Infection Control 37(7):525–33.

Lipscomb J, Sokas R, McPhaul K, et al. (2009). Occupational blood exposure among unlicensed home care workers and home care registered nurses: Are they protected? American Journal of Industrial Medicine 52(7):563–70.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). (2013a; latest update 2001). OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Retrieved from https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=10051.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). (2011). A Guide to Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace. Retrieved August 21, 2013 from http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/indguide/ig7.pdf.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). (2011). Overview of State Needle Safety Regulation. Retrieved August 21, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/bbp/ndl-law.html

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). (2007). Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, Standard Interpretations: Use of rapid HIV antibody testing on a source individual after an exposure incident. Retrieved from http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id=25619.

Quinn MM, Markkanen PK, Galligan CJ, et al. (2009). Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home healthcare nurses and aides. American Journal of Public Health 99(S3:S7):10–17.

Scharf BB, McPhaul KM, Trinkoff A, Lipscomb J. (2009). Evaluation of home healthcare nurses’ practice and their employers’ policies related to bloodborne pathogens. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Journal 57(7):275–80.

Sharma GK, Gilson MM, Nathan H, Makary MA. (2009). Needlestick injuries among medical students: incidence and implications. Academic Medicine 84(12):1815–21.

Thompson ND, Perz JF, Moorman AC, Holmberg SD. (2008). Nonhospital healthcare-associated hepatitis B and C virus transmission: United States, 1998–2008. Ann Intern Med 150:33–39.

Trinkoff AM, Le R, Geiger-Brown J, Lipscomb J. (2007). Work Schedule, Needle Use, and Needlestick Injuries Among Registered Nurses. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 28:156–64.

United States Department of Justice (USDOJ). (2009). Rate of Confirmed AIDS in Prison 2.5 Times the Rate I the U.S General Population. Retrieved August 21, 2013 from www.ojp.usdoj.gov/newsroom/pressreleases/2009/bjs10026.htm.

For Individual States

California. Bloodborne Pathogens. Exposure Control Plan for Bloodborne Pathogens. Access at http://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/5193.HTML §5193.

Iowa. Iowa School Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens and Needlestick Prevention. Access at educateiowa.gov/index.php?option=com.

Michigan. Bloodborne Infectious Diseases. Part 554. Access at http://www.michigan.gov/documents/CIS_WSH_part554_35632_7.pdf.

Missouri. Bloodborne Pathogens Guideline for Exposure Control Plan and Staff inservice. Access at http://health.mo.gov/living/families/schoolhealth/pdf/GuidelinesForBloodbornePathogens.pdf.

New Jersey. PEOSH Revised Bloodborne Pathogens Standard 29 CFR 1910.1030. Access at http://www.state.nj.us/health/eoh/peoshweb/bbpsib.pdf

New Mexico. New Mexico State Standards 57:47124. Access at http://www.nmschoolhealthmanual.org/shm_17.pdf.

New York. New York State Department of Health Policy Statement and Guidelines to Prevent Transmission of Bloodborne Pathogens from Infected Health Care Personnel through Medical/Dental Procedures. Appendix B. Access at http://www.health.ny.gov/publications/1852/appenb.htm.

North Carolina. A Guide to Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace. Access at http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/indguide/ig7.pdf or http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/A_to_Z_Topics/bloodborne_faq1.pdf.

Oregon. Bloodborne Pathogens: Questions and Answers about Occupational Exposure. Access athttp://www.cbs.state.or.us/osha/pdf/pubs/2261.pdf.

Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania HB 454 was signed into law as Act 96. Access at https://www.ects.org/Human_Resources/BloodBorne.pdf.

Texas Bloodborne Pathogen Law:

Locate Health and Safety Code, then click Chapter 81, Communicable Disease, then click subchapter H, Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan 81.301 through 81.307.

Texas Dept of State Health Service Bloodborne Pathogen Rules in the Texas Administrative Code:

Go to Title 25 Health Service, then to Part 1, Department of State Health Services, then to Chapter 96, Bloodborne Pathogen Control 96.101 through 96.501.

Washington State. WAC, Bloodborne Pathogens, pp. 296-823. Access at http://www.lni.wa.gov/wisha/rules/bbpathogens/.

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