About Suicide Screening, Referral, and Imminent Harm in Washington State, 3 units

Approved by the Washington State Department of Health for certified counselors and advisers, chemical dependence professionals, chiropractors, occupational therapists and assistants, physical therapists and assistants, pharmacists, and dentists. Approval #TRNG.TG.60824032-SUIC.

Describes the scope of suicide in Washington State and nationally. Discusses warning signs, screening and referral, and assessment of issues related to imminent harm via lethal means. Go to course 

  • The scope of suicide in the United States and Washington State.
  • Warning signs for suicide.
  • Principles of effective suicide screening.
  • Appropriate referral resources for high, medium, and low-risk clients.
  • Imminent harm.
  • Responsibilities of pharmacists related to suicide prevention.

About Suicide in Washington State, 6 units

This course is approved by the Washington State Department of Health. These professions must take a six-hour course on suicide assessment, treatment, and management: nurses, social workers, licensed mental health professionals, marriage and family therapists, naturopaths, osteopathic physicians/surgeons/physician assistants, physicians and physician assistants, psychologists, and retired active licensees. Approval #TRNG.TG.60817428-SUIC.

The purpose of this course is to educate healthcare professionals and others in Washington State about the scope and seriousness of suicide. It includes information about suicide risk screening and assessment, identifies groups who are disproportionally affected by suicide, discusses psychosocial and pharmacological treatment methods, describes the role of supportive third parties in reducing suicide ideation and behaviors, relates aspects of military culture that may affect the incidence of suicide in active-duty military and veterans, explains protective factors, and spells out practical guidelines that can reduce access to lethal means. Go to course 

  • Scope of suicide in Washington State and nationally.
  • Main components of suicide risk screening and assessment.
  • Groups that are disproportionately impacted by suicide.
  • Relate 3 differences between high risk of suicide and low risk.
  • Psychosocial techniques that have been shown to reduce the risk of suicidal ideation and behaviors.
  • Why psychiatric medications may reduce suicidal ideations and behaviors.
  • Why supportive third parties can help reduce suicidal ideation and behaviors in their communities.
  • Aspects of military culture that may affect the incidence of suicide in active-duty military and veterans.
  • Protective factors against suicidal ideation and suicidal behaviors in veteran populations.
  • Lethal means.

Suicide in America

This course will educate healthcare professionals and others about the scope and seriousness of suicide in America. It identifies groups who are disproportionally affected by suicide, provides information about suicide screening, and discusses psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments. It describes the importance of supportive third parties, spells out practical guidelines to reduce access to lethal means, and relates aspects of military culture that may affect the incidence of suicide in active-duty military and veterans. Go to course

  1. Recent scope of suicide nationally and worldwide.
  2. Warning signs and risk factors related to suicidal ideation and behaviors.
  3. Demographic groups disproportionately impacted by suicide.
  4. Gender differences related to suicidal ideation and behaviors.
  5. Main components of suicide risk screening and assessment.
  6. Main components of management of suicidal patients.
  7. Lethal means.
  8. Why safety planning is a critical part of care for suicidal patients.
  9. Main components of social and community support.
  10. Aspects of military culture that may affect the incidence of suicide in active-duty military and veterans.